learning

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For the Love of Learning

Published March 4, 2015 by sidmary

Who among us has never seen or experienced the early morning frenzy that seizes the households where everyone has to leave for some place or the other and reach before a certain time? School students, college students, university students, office workers…it is a routine unmanned by occupation. However early you get up, and however fast you get ready, the clock in the morning ticks at an unparalleled speed trying to make you late.

What if in this situation, in the time it takes you to hear the horn, open the door and move out, your van leaves? What if, even as you stand at the gate, you see the receding behind of the indomitable vehicle mocking you in the face for the one second delay? At least once in a lifetime, this has happened with most of us.

But wait…! What if your wish or need to get to school, or college overpowers the misery and seething anger you are feeling at the situation? What if you get into your car and drive across half the city to reach the institution, only to realize that you are one minute late and cannot enter the premises? Blam! There goes the world crumbling around you; one more morning incident to fire your nerves and heat your blood. You go quickly over the schedule of the day in your mind weighing how important attending classes today was…and you comfort yourself with the conclusion that you will get notes from your friend and all will be fine. Then you go home and plop on the bed, making up for the sleep you lost last night making an assignment you had to submit today.

What a comedy of errors! Or maybe a tragedy? Who knows? However, there is one very important aspect to this not uncommon scenario that it would a tragedy to not explore: the policy of educational institutions to send students back home even if they are half a minute late. Yes, just thirty seconds worth of delay.

Let us look first at the reasons for this strict policy. It is majorly because institutions want to instill the value of punctuality in their students, and maintain some decorum in the school that such strict policies are made; and yet one is forced to question: is all fine with this?

The early schools which were the centers of learning and research were homely places where all were welcome. They were institutes from where learning developed and advanced, and the forbears of the educational institutions we have today. They developed the sciences which are taught in our schools today, but what were their salient features? These were schools which remained open at all times. It was sin to close the doors of learning on those who sought them. Knowledge was sacred, and withholding it from the seeker was blasphemy.

In the modern day, when education has been institutionalized, rules and policies are required to be stricter. Students are and should be expected to adhere to certain norms of behavior, but the strict policy and rule making should follow some rules too. Humans are not sheep- all to be herded indiscriminately by the same stick, and education and learning is not a child’s play to be taken lightly and undervalued by the centers of education themselves.

To instill punctuality in students and maintain the decorum of schools and colleges, penalties are and should be issued to those who undervalue the importance of learning and those who are religiously non-punctual, but to send students home who are late once in a blue moon and with genuine reason is blasphemy! What educational institutions encourage this way is students going home and sleeping the productive morning hours away. Along with the student, they are equally to blame for the loss of precious time and perhaps more for not understanding the value and importance of one whole day of learning.

It is about time that educational institutions make policies with practicality and the objective of learning in their minds. The effort of one who wakes up in the wee morning hours, gets ready and travels a good half hour or more to get to school or college should be appreciated and respected, and more than the clock’s face should be considered when sending one back down the same path they took to learning.

Open-Book

–Sidra Maryam

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Lessons from my Grandmother

Published December 15, 2011 by sidmary

Every time I’d remember it,
Afresh-anew,
A low sob would escape into my pillow.
“Grandma”
I’d slowly whisper.
 

Then I would see her knitting,
  Just knitting away,
  Over that whole book of advises.
  Or sewing,
  Just sewing away,
  Over that long list of suggestions.

   Then I would think of all those things
   I wanted to learn from her,
   Or which she wanted to teach me.

And now,
I realize,
That for everything I want to do,
Or learn,
There’s no tomorrow.
Just now-and this moment to avail.

  Then I would see her talking,
  Talking to me,
  As if I was someone special;
   Of all her days I hadn’t seen
  Her special moments,
  people,
  All those years away.
   
   And again a low sob would escape me,
   “Grandma” 
   I’d say.

But now,
I understand,
that all those moments of my busy life,
Are not mine.
And all those little things,
That mean so much,
Are meant to be shared
With all those special people,
who care.
And that my time,
Is not mine,
But borrowed, 
of theirs’.

  Then when I’d relive it again:
  That peaceful smile,
  Contented eyes,
  closed,
  forever,
  A louder sob would escape me.
   And
   “Grandma”
   I’d almost cry.

But today,
Just today,
It dawned upon me,
That time and death,
Are close friends.
Like me and Life?
And that,
All I’ve got is today,
For all those smiles to scatter,
All those eyes to contend.
 Because Grandma,
 She taught me,
 With her very being:
 that 
 Life
 is too  
 short,
 and Time;
 too fast.
 and what closely follows,
 is death.
 And that alone,
 Makes Life so important,
 And that again,
 is the sole reason
 to gain,
 from giving,
 In this Life.

 

Sidra Maryam

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